Virtual PRG
School Road, Mawsley,
Kettering, NN14 1SN
enquiries@mawsleymedical.co.uk
Telephone us on  01536 791300

IMPORTANT PATIENT INFORMATION

 

ARE YOU A CARER?

Why not join Mawsley and Broughton Carers Group?

You will be able to chat with other carers over tea or coffee and hear from relevant speakers who understand the challenges you face.

 Our next meeting will be on Wednesday 6th December 2017 at  11am at the Surgery

All welcome - you do not need to be a patient.

 

IF YOU ARE CALLING TO REQUEST BLOOD RESULTS PLEASE CALL AFTER 10AM TO ALLOW THE STAFF TO DEAL WITH CALLS REQUESTING SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS - THANK YOU

 

FLU VACCINE CLINICS - Flu vaccines available. You should be receiving a text message if you are eligible to book in, alternatively if you know you eligible please ring or call into reception to book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice closure dates for staff training - Surgery and dispensary will close at 12pm on these days 

 

6 December

17 January

21 February

14 March

18 April

16 May

13 June

11 July

12 September

10 October

14 November

5 December

NEWS : We now have a pharmacist working with the practice on a Wednesday to support the Doctors. We welcome Advanced Nurse Practicitor Kerri Wood who works with us on a monday.

SURGERY OPENING TIMES
Monday 8AM - 6PM
Tuesday 8AM - 6PM
Wednesday 8AM - 6PM
Thursday 8AM - 7.30PM
Friday 8AM - 6PM
We are closed at weekends
DISPENSARY OPENING TIMES
Monday 9AM - 12PM
1PM - 6PM
Tuesday 9AM - 12PM
1PM - 6PM
Wednesday 9AM - 12PM
1PM - 6PM
Thursday 9AM - 12PM
1PM - 6PM
Friday 9AM - 12PM
1PM - 6PM
We are closed at weekends

 

Rashes or spots in ill/feverish children

Introduction
Children can get rashes or spots with many illnesses. They are mostly harmless and go away by themselves. Our good vaccination programme means that, nowadays, a number of children’s illnesses rarely occur in the United Kingdom. Unfortunately, there are many illnesses for which no vaccination exists. Most of them are caused by a virus. They can neither be prevented nor treated.


Symptoms

Chicken Pox
Chicken pox has itchy spots which blister. The spots spread out from the body to the arms and legs. Spots can even occur in the mouth and eyes. They come out in batches every 4-6 hours. Chicken pox is highly contagious (catching) until all the spots have become dry. Children do not need to stay in bed but they must avoid direct contact with non-immune people and pregnant ladies until 12 hours after the last batch of spots have dried.

Roseola
Roseaola (exanthema subiton) occurs mainly among children under three and generally between the first and second year of life. It normally starts with 3 days of high fever (39-40 C) followed by a day without fever. After that small, pink, rounded spots appear, beginning on the face and later spreading to the arms and legs. Sometimes glands in the throat and the back of the head will swell. As with other spotty illnesses this one is generally harmless and cures itself.

Slapped Cheek Syndrome
Slapped cheek syndrome (erythema infectiosum) usually starts off with rosy red cheeks. It then spreads to the arms and legs. The spots can stay for several weeks; otherwise there are no serious symptoms.

Scarletina
Scarletina starts with a sore throat, vomiting and fever. Shortly afterwards or at the same time tiny spots appear everywhere except around the mouth. First the tongue turns white and after 3 days or so turns red and thickened (strawberry tongue). After 2/3 weeks the skin becomes flaky (hands and soles of feet). Give rest according to need. As a rule antibiotics are prescribed for scarlet fever.

Meningitis
Meningitis is VERY RARE and the child becomes ill very quickly. The rash is reddish-blue or violet in colour and does not disappear if pressed (unlike the rashes previously mentioned)

*********CONTACT YOUR DOCTOR OR PHONE FOR AN AMBULANCE IMMEDIATELY IF IT OCCURS*************

German Measles (Rubella) & Measles
These are now very rare in the UK thanks to our vaccination programme. German measles produces a very mild illness and a very faint rash which may not even be noticed. The only danger is to pregnant women who have not been vaccinated. Measles is always accompanied by fever, cough and watery eyes. The rash appears about 36-48 hours after the child first becomes ill, first behind the ears, then spreading to the face and body. It is blotchy, joined up and red, becoming dirty brown in colour. Because this is a notifiable disease, you will need to contact the practice or your health visitor, as we will need to take a saliva test to make a diagnosis.

Hand, foot and mouth disease
Epidemics occur approximately every three years. The rash is grey with small blisters (vesicles) usually found in the mouth, on the fingers, palms, soles, heels and buttocks.


Treatment: What you can do for yourself
Do not let the child scratch any rash or spots because of the risk of infection and scarring. If itchy, use an oily calamine lotion or cream. Cut your child’s nails short. Wash your hands and your child’s hands frequently. Once wooziness and listlessness have passed, let the child get out of bed and once the fever has gone the child can go out to play.

Contact your doctor if:

  • The fever increases or is still present after 4-5 days.
  • Your child has reddish-blue or violet spots which do not disappear if pressed under a tumbler.
  • Your child is unable to speak or is not reacting to surroundings
  • Your child is becoming more ill quickly.